Monday, September 22, 2008

Sleepful in Seattle: Rumors, Rain, and Restaurants

So, about those rumors that Seattle is the most rainy/grey city ever…they’re all completely true.

When Gliner and I found out that we were given the ENTIRE weekend off (a rarity during harvest season) because no grapes were ripe enough to be picked for a few days, Road Trip Seattle became our #1 priority.

Gliner, only up $40 from Friday night casino play (due in part to a lack of participation in Hold ‘Em, forcing him to turn to his less artful pastime of Blackjack), didn’t “pay for everything” as would have been the case had he been a winner…

With Garmin in hand, we took off to Seattle. As we departed, for the first time since we’ve been in the Tri-Cities we experienced rain, providing the RSX with a much-needed wash from Mother Nature. After an absolutely dull drive through the flat brown-grassed terrain of the Yakima Valley, we entered the Cascade Mountains. Evergreen Trees soon surrounded us, and it finally made sense to me why Washington insisted on being called “The Evergreen State” rather than “The Boring Flatlands Dotted With Wineries State” or “The Columbia River Runs Through It State.”

However, just as quickly as the Evergreen Trees found a fond place in my heart, they disappeared. They were the metaphorical “ones that got away.” This was not due to red-necked Oregonian lumberjacks crossing state-lines to wreak the havoc of their chainsaws upon our CO2-friendly friends, but due to an intense wave of fog that overtook the entire region making it so we couldn’t even see the trees on the side of the road, let alone Mount Rainier and the rest of the supposedly majestic Cascades.

Upon arrival to Seattle, we ate at Wild Ginger, a restaurant recommended to us both by my guidebook and our boss. Though the food impressed me, Gliner was unsatisfied, as both his soup and entrée were “more salty than the Pacific.” Now, at this restaurant, most entrees hover around $10. Famished from not eating all day, Gliner and I each ordered two entrees – a bowl of soup and a meat dish. While ordering, our waiter informed us that the soups were entrée-sized. I responded, “I know. If there’s leftover food, I’ll take a doggie bag, no worries.” I thought my intentions to devour everything from my two plates (and potentially the petite hostess if I had room in my stomach) were clear. Only when the waiter returned with our soups, authoritatively stating, “I knew two entrees for each of you was a lot of food, so I took it upon myself to reduce your portions to a smaller size” did I become mildly agitated. This anger peaked when I mowed through both portions like The Black Widow at Wing Bowl and still had plenty of room for additional food.

Note to our Overconfident Waiter: If people order large portions, let them have a field day (and your tips will be larger). You need not be a crusader against America’s obesity pandemic. Your job is to serve food and occasionally help me decide whether to eat the Seven Elements Soup (recommendations were your strong point) or the sub-par Crab Wan-Tan Bowl that Gliner was stuck with because he didn’t listen to your advice…

1 comment:

Sarena said...

Ahh, the memories! Why wasn't I there to see those beatiful evergreens, event through the fog... my infatuation with trees has hit an all-time high.

Also, I completely understand your frustration with the waiter. Not to mention, his efforts to thwart gluttony (an important task for this country) will only bite him in the butt, and make you hungrier...